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Malaria

Preventable and Curable

Sumbanese girls like this one need your helpLast year malaria killed more people worldwide than HIV/AIDS (about 3 million people), with the majority of the deaths occurring in children less than five years of age. Unlike AIDS, malaria can be prevented and cured.

In 2008 we will be expanding our project as fast as possible to cover hundreds of villages and to thousands of more people. However as we expand we will still have to maintain, diagnose and treat those that are now under our aid umbrella. Funding them is crucial to the long term sustainability of our work.

Sumba has one of the highest occurrences of malaria in Asia. To address this urgent problem, in 2004 we retained a world renowned malaria expert, Dr. Claus Bogh, to develop our malaria and health programs.

An estimated 20% of all children die or become severely brain damaged by malaria before the age of 10. Based on our clinical surveys of targeted villages, 62% of the children below the age of 5 and 30% of the total population had malaria. That number has now been drastically reduced by 85% in the children living in the villages that are covered in Phase 1 of our Malaria Control Program.

Phase 1 of our comprehensive Malaria Control Program started in 2004 and covered 603 people in 6 villages. In 2007, our Phase 2 expansion has reached 6,000 people living in 121 villages within a 45 square kilometer area. At least 60 children’s lives have been saved since the start of the program.

Our comprehensive approach includes:

  • conducting baseline testing to establish existing malaria infection rates and a population census for each village
  • mass screening of the entire population living in the villages
  • distribution of insecticide treated mosquito nets for each household
  • on-going testing and treatment for malaria cases
  • constantly upgrading our clinics capabilities for malaria diagnosis and treatment
  • consistent monitoring of bed net usage and maintenance

Our goal is to eliminate all deaths from malaria in our project areas and to reduce the number of malaria cases by at least 90 percent.

Malaria Projects To Be Sponsored


Adopt a Large Village - Treat and Protect More Than 500 People

Funding will includes the mapping of the area including neighboring smaller villages, mass malaria screening of the entire population, fast dipstick blood testing, medical treatment with the best anti-malarial medicines, hiring and training of village health workers, de-worming and vitamin-A treatment of all above 2 years of age, and the on-going compliance monitoring and maintenance of the program. This also includes the purchase and distribution of specially imported long lasting impregnated mosquito nets. The nets are produced from synthetic fibers that are impregnated with strong insecticides.

US$25,000


Adopt a Medium Village - Treat and Protect More Than 250 People

Funding will includes the purchase and distribution of mosquito nets, blood testing and medical treatment with anti-malarial medicines, the hiring and training of village health workers and the on-going compliance, monitoring and maintenance of the program in the village.

US$12,500


Adopt a Small Village - Treat and Protect More Than 100 People

Funding will includes the purchase and distribution of mosquito nets, blood testing and medical treatment with anti-malarial medicines, the hiring and training of village health workers and the on-going compliance, monitoring and maintenance of the program in the village.

US$5,000


Malaria Microscopy Training Program

Limitations in good laboratory diagnosis have always been a limiting factor in achieving effective health care in the developing world. This is particularly true for malaria where good diagnosis is essential and malaria is a disease that mostly affects remote and poor areas.

Microscopy remains the reference standard for malaria diagnosis in clinical care for much of the world today. However, it is well known that microscopy is an imperfect standard prone to errors such as: limited training of the microscopist, experience, motivation, laboratory resources and quality of equipment. To control malaria and save lives it is essential that expert malaria microscopy is available in endemic areas such as eastern Indonesia.

Over the past four years the Sumba Foundation has established a comprehensive Malaria Control Program that now covers a population of 18,000 and diagnosis is provided through the Foundations 5 medical clinics. To further expand the reach of our malaria control program to all of Sumba and also its neighboring islands of Flores, Timor, Alor and Sumbawa we propose to establish a Malaria Microscopy Training Center that will benefit the tens of thousands of people suffering from malaria on a daily basis.

The project will be executed by The Sumba Foundation in close collaboration with the Eijkman institute and NAMRU-2 as well as the four district health offices of Sumba. To cut costs, the center will initially be established in rented premises and further developed over the coming years. Approximately 50-60 microscopists will be trained and certified within the first year of operations and we could train up to 80 each year thereafter. This is by far the fastest way to expand our malaria work. In so doing we can save lives and help hundreds of thousands of people each year.

Funding would provide for 16 nurses to attend a 10-day training

US$3,000


Mosquito Nets

Funding will provide 100 mosquito nets to protect from re-infection with Malaria.

US$1,000


Anti-malarial Diagnosis and Medicine

Funding will provide 50 people with life-saving anti-malarial diagnosis and medicine.

US$250